Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Annual Report

Section I: Introduction and College Position Statement

King Edward VI College is committed to creating and promoting an inclusive learning community in which diversity is celebrated, where inequality and stereotypes are challenged and where all people are treated with dignity and respect.  This involves the conscious efforts of all members of the college community: staff, students, and governors.  Advancing equality of opportunity is at the core of the college mission statement and its ethos permeates the college values.  We are committed to providing equality of opportunity so that everyone can achieve their full potential.  Compliance with the Equality Act 2010 is an integral part of this approach.

This report aims to provide transparency on the outcomes and experiences of different groups of students and staff, by providing an update on key achievements, developments and performance indicators.  Recommendations for future actions are outlined in Section VI and are specifically addressed through the college’s Equality Objectives and Quality Improvement Plan.

All college policies and procedures undergo an Equality Impact Assessment (EIA) to ensure that the needs of all protected groups are taken into account. Where EIA evidence highlights the need for any change of practice an action plan is put into place and monitored by the college leadership team.

Culture Day

Culture Day

Section II: Public Sector Equality Duty 

2.1  In April 2011 a new public sector equality duty, known as the general duty, came into force.  This replaced the previous separate duties to promote race, disability and gender equality.  This duty requires the college, in the exercise of its functions, to have due regard of the need to fulfil the three aims of the duty: 

  1. Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation 
  2. Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not
  3. Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not 

2.2  The general duty is underpinned by two specific duties: (1) to publish equality information annually and (2) to publish equality objectives initially by 6th April 2012 and then every four years.  The current equality information published on the college website is attached as Appendices 1 and 2; the current equality objectives are attached as Appendix 3.

2.1  Our equality objectives have been developed with the intention of ensuring that we proactively further the three aims of the Equality Act and that we continue to develop and promote the college values described in our position statement. These objectives are monitored regularly by the senior leadership team and updated accordingly.  Progress towards achieving the objectives is reported to governors.

Wellbeing Day

Wellbeing Day

Section III: Key Events and Achievements 

3.1  The Student Equality Action Group (SEAG) is well established and plays a prominent role in celebrating the rich diversity of the college community.  This year the group is run by Olivia Langford, Ashley Nyauhunga, Aaliyah Michael, Jamie Lee Matthews, Naomi Shore, Mya Saura and Alex Westwood who is also the Student Union Equality and Diversity Officer and runs the LGBT+ group. Meetings are held weekly with over thirty students attending discussions on current equality issues.  The group has links with the Student Union who have helped with the funding of events and is regularly consulted on college-wide equality and diversity matters. 

3.2  The student-led LGBT+ group is one of the most popular and well-attended enrichment activities. It meets regularly to discuss relevant issues for the LGBT+ community. They have been instrumental in raising awareness during LGBT+ Awareness Month (February) and have worked with the college’s EDI co-ordinator to produce a tutorial for students on transsexuals.

3.3  Well-being Day, emerging from our pledge to continue to challenge the stigma of mental illness after the successful Time to Change & Rethink Mental Illness campaign, took place on 5th February 2016 with a focus on physical and mental health and well-being. Local and national mental and physical health partners were invited to attend alongside charities, student led events and displays. This year’s event’s theme is ‘It’s time to talk’ and is aimed at tackling the stigma of mental illness.

3.4  Culture Day, organised and run by students, takes place every July and is a flagship event in terms of celebrating the diverse college community. Food, performances, costumes, faiths, beliefs and interests are all shared and celebrated in this whole college community event

Section IV: Student Key Performance Indicators

4.1  Student achievement – overview: examination results for each subject are analysed according to gender, ethnic groups and disability. Overall, student achievement is ahead of national averages regardless of protected group; however, some achievement gaps exist and, whilst these are smaller than national gaps, we want to reduce any achievement disparities; Action 7.2 of the quality improvement plan specifically addresses this concern (see Appendix 4). 

4.2  Achievement data by ethnicity: All students achieve significantly above the national average for their group, as illustrated in the tables below (SFC averages in brackets) 

 

College Pass Rates – by Ethnicity

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

White British

99.2 (94.7)

78.8

98.0 (97.8)

79.9

98.1 (97.4)

79.5

95.8 (95.8)

82.9

BAME

99.3 (94.9)

19.2

98.1 (97.7)

17.7

96.4 (96.7)

18.4

94.1 (95.4)

15.9

All learners

99.2 (94.7)

 

98.1 (97.8)

 

97.8 (97.3)

 

95.6 (95.7)

 

 

College High Grade Rates – by Ethnicity

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College

High Grade

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College

High Grade

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College High Grade

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College High Grade

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

White British

63.4

78.8

49.1 (31.5)

79.9

51.0 (31.5)

79.5

49.8 (31.3)

82.9

BAME

55.9

19.2

41.5 (25.2)

17.7

46.5 (25.2)

18.4

40.0 (21.6)

15.9

All learners

61.9

 

47.6

(30.1)

 

50.0

(29.5)

 

48.7 (29.1)

 

Note: SFC national High Grade rates are no longer published  

 

College Retention Rates – by Ethnicity

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

White British

97.9 (95.3)

78.8

98.5 (97.4)

79.9

97.5 (97.5)

79.5

97.3 (96.9)

82.9

BAME

98.3 (95.6)

19.2

98.7 (97.6)

17.7

99.0 (97.6)

18.4

97.0 (97.2)

15.9

All learners

98.0 (95.4)

 

98.5 (97.4)

 

97.8 (97.5)

 

97.2 (96.9)

 

 

 

College Achievement Rates – by Ethnicity

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

White British

97.1 (90.4)

78.8

96.6 (95.2)

79.9

95.6 (94.9)

79.5

93.2 (92.8)

82.9

BAME

97.6 (90.9)

19.2

96.8 (95.4)

17.7

95.4 (94.4)

18.4

91.3 (92.8)

15.9

All learners

97.2 (90.5)

 

96.6 (95.3)

 

95.6 (94.8)

 

92.9 (92.8)

  

4.3  Data from Pro-achieve shows that achievement and high grade rates of all BAME groups were significantly in excess of the national averages for those groups.  However, some such groups perform less well than White British students: 

  • Achievement and high grades rates are notably lower for Pakistani heritage students 
  • The gap in high grade rates between White British female and Pakistani heritage male has reduced but there is still some disparity. 

 

Indian

Pakistani

White British

 

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Achievement

98.0%

100.0%

93.8%

97.0%

97.7%

97.3%

High grades

56.0%

66.3%

55.0%

43.1%

60.2%

65.0%

4.4  Achievement data by gender: as demonstrated by the tables below, there is no significant variation in achievement rates between male and female students.  However there is a clear trend over time of stronger value added for male students than female students; in addition 2016 saw a notable dip in value added for female students. 

 

College Pass Rates – by Gender

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Pass

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

Female

99.3 (94.8)

60.1

98.6 (97.9)

58.6

97.9 (97.5)

54.3

96.1 (96.0)

56.5

Male

98.9 (94.7)

39.9

97.4 (97.5)

41.4

97.7 (97.0)

45.7

94.9 (95.4)

43.5

All learners

99.2 (94.7)

 

98.1 (97.8)

 

97.8 (97.3)

 

95.6 (95.7)

 

 

College Retention Rates – by Gender

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Retention

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

Female

97.6 (94.3)

60.1

98.9 (97.4)

58.6

98.3 (97.4)

54.3

97.0 (96.7)

56.5

Male

98.6 (96.8)

39.9

97.9 (97.5)

41.4

97.1 (97.6)

45.7

97.5 (97.2)

43.5

All learners

98.0 (95.4)

 

98.5 (97.4)

 

97.8 (97.5)

 

97.2 (96.9)

 

 

College Achievement Rates – by Gender

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College Achievement

Rates

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

Female

96.9 (89.6)

60.1

97.5 (95.3)

58.6

96.2 (95.0)

54.3

93.2 (92.9)

56.5

Male

97.5 (91.7)

39.9

95.4 (95.2)

41.4

94.8 (94.6)

45.7

92.5 (92.7)

43.5

All learners

97.2 (90.5)

 

96.6 (95.3)

 

95.6 (94.8)

 

92.9 (92.8)

 

 

College Value Added– by Gender*

 

2016

2015

2014

2013

 

College VA

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College VA

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College VA

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

College VA

Learner Cohort Proportion

(%)

Female

-0.04

58.6

0.08

58.6

0.01

54.3

0.03

56.5

Male

0.06

41.4

0.09

41.4

0.06

45.7

0.14

43.5

All learners

0.00

 

0.09

 

0.04

 

0.07

 

Culture Day

Culture Day

4.5 Student Perception: an annual survey is conducted to gather student views on a range of issues, relating to their academic subjects and to cross-college areas.  This data is scrutinised for the self-assessment report at whole college, faculty and subject levels.  Any areas of concern are identified with associated actions in quality improvement plans.  The aim is to ensure that each student receives a high quality educational experience and is supported and enabled to achieve his/her potential. 

Analysis of the 2016 student survey was conducted, with the results reported to the College Leadership Team and to Governors.  Student responses to the statements and ‘Teachers create an atmosphere of equality’ the college scores comfortably above national benchmarks.

The following equality issues have been identified from this analysis:  

  • I feel safe on college premises’: 99% of students agree with this statement; in external benchmarking (based on 71,562 learners from 14 sixth form colleges) this places the college in the upper quartile nationally.  Internal benchmarking shows that there are no significant differences by gender or ethnicity. However students who disclose a disability are less positive (82.4% agree, 17 respondents).  
  • ‘Teachers create an atmosphere of equality’: 97% of students agree with this statement; in external benchmarking,the rating is in the upper quartile nationally. However for the small number of students who preferred not to disclose their gender, responses to this question were less positive.




4.6  Student Recruitment for September 2016 intake (*change from previous year) 

 

 

Student recruitment for September 2016 intake

(*change from previous year)

 

 

Total Applicants: 2290 (+197)*

Total Enrolled: 1074 (-7)*

Offers

Conversion Rate

Gender

Female

58%

(1323)

60%

(640)

59%

(1019)

48%

Male

42%

(965)

40%

(433)

41%

(710)

45%

Other

0.08%

(2)

0%

(0)

0.1%

(2)

0%

Ethnicity

White

68%

(1557)

75%

(804)

73%

(1257)

52%

Asian Indian

7%

(162)

5%

(54)

6%

(105)

33%

Asian Pakistani

7%

(166)

5%

(50)

6%

(98)

30%

Black

4%

(89)

3%

(32)

3%

(51)

36%

Mixed

5%

(121)

5%

(57)

5%

(90)

47%

Other

9%

(195)

7%

(76)

8%

(130)

39%

Disability/ALS

2.9% of students enrolled in September have disclosed a need significant enough to require assistance from the Additional Learning Support Team.

Students

Students

The numbers above are not as straightforward as they may appear; as a selective institution, the predicted GCSE grades are a driving factor in the selection process. 

By increasingly focussing on potential as well as predicted grades, recruitment for BAME applicants, has become more inclusive. 

1. The gender ratio is negatively influenced by a male dominated selective sixth form close by, but remains in line with the national average for sixth form colleges

2. This increase is especially pleasing in light of the college’s continued recruitment expansion into Worcestershire which predominantly attracts applicants from white backgrounds.

Section V: Staff Key Performance Indicators

5.1   Staff Recruitment: a comprehensive analysis of staff recruitment (2015–2016) is attached as Appendix 5.  This data demonstrates that we are currently attracting applicants from BAME groups which reflect the proportional demographics within Dudley MBC.  However the overall staff profile as outlined below in 5.1 highlights a need to take positive action at recruitment stage. 

5.2  Staff Profile as of September 2016 

Gender:     The staff profile detailed in Appendix 1 indicates a greater proportion of female staff; however, this ratio is similar to the student profile.  Without the availability of national figures, it is difficult to draw any meaningful conclusions from this ratio. 

Disability: The option ‘Prefer not to say’ was added to the equal opportunities monitoring form from September 2013.  We are aware that the figure 92.19% with no reported disability is not an accurate reflection of disability amongst staff.  

Awareness raising activities aimed at promoting the benefits of declaration have not led to any increase and further strategies are required to address this area. 

Ethnicity:  An increasingly diverse student population (25% BAME) is not reflected in the staff profile (7% BAME).

5.3  Staff Perception 

E&D issues arising from 2016 survey:

The number of staff participating in the survey improved in comparison with previous years (2016: 130, 2015: 123, 2014: 92, 2013: 119).  An analysis by some aspects of demographics suggests that staff satisfaction is not consistent across all groups.  Those choosing ‘prefer not to answer’ in relation to ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation and gender have much less positive views than those responding, for example, as “heterosexual or straight” or ‘White British’. 

The table below presents responses to questions relating to equality and diversity: 

Question

Agree

Difference*

I am familiar with the College’s Equality & Diversity policy

94% agree

+1

The college provides equal opportunities for all

84% agree

-3

I know what to do if someone is bullied

94% agree

-2

The college provides a safe environment for those with disabilities      

86% agree

+1

* Difference compared to 2015 survey

5.4  Governor Profile:   

The profile of the current Board of Governors is detailed in Appendix 6.  Over time the proportion of BAME students has increased and the college is sensitive to the need to reflect this change within the governing body. 

Section VI: Key Equality Challenges

The changes outlined below will be incorporated in the college’s equality objectives. 

6.1  Student Equality Challenges: 

Change needed

Actions

  1. Continue to improve the communication to applicants regarding the benefits of disclosing disability at the point of application
  • Assistant Principal (Admissions and Marketing) to develop a strategy to encourage greater disclosure at interview and induction stage

 

  • Assistant Principal (Student Support) to establish further appropriate disclosure points within induction and on-going reviews and develop a communication strategy to effectively promote this
  1. Improve the attendance of BAME students
  • EDI steering committee to explore reasons for attendance gaps and devise actions arising from consultation

 

  • Conduct staff training to raise awareness of ‘unconscious bias’ (see 6.3 below)
  1. Reduce the achievement gap between female and male students (value added is more positive for male students)

This change is addressed in the college Quality Improvement Plan

  1. Further develop the promotion of common British Values throughout the college

This change is addressed in the college Quality Improvement Plan

6.2  Student and Staff Equality Challenges: 

Change needed

Actions

Improve contemplation room facilities for students and staff

Launch and publicise new contemplation room facilities

6.3  Staff Equality Challenges: 

Change needed

Actions

  1. Increase the level of disclosure of ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and religion in the annual staff survey
  • Adopt ‘Stonewall’ guidelines on disclosure of protected characteristics

 

  • Further clarify and communicate to participants the level of anonymity
  1. Further increase awareness of ‘unconscious bias’

Arrange follow-up EDI staff training to specifically address unconscious bias

6.4  Governor Equality Challenges:   

Change needed

Actions

Increase the representation of people from BAME groups

Apply the revised governors’ recruitment policy (May 2015) as appropriate when the opportunity arises

Appendix 1 - Equality Information Profile of Staff

Appendix 2 - Equality Information Profile of Students

Appendix 5 - Equal Opportunity Recruitment Analysis

Appendix 6 - Governors Equality and Diversity Monitoring

99.5%

Overall pass rate for A levels in 2016

44%

In 2016, 44% of our students accepted offers at Russell Group universities

100%

Pass rate in 26 subjects

My courses

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